Posts Tagged ‘Transitional Housing’

12% Decrease in Homeless Veterans

Thursday, December 22nd, 2011

According to an article in Stars and Stripes, there are fewer homeless veterans than there were last year. The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) and the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) recently issued a report claiming that there are 12% fewer homeless veterans across the nation.

VA Sec. Eric Shinseki and HUD Sec. Shaun Donovan both referred to this as a trend and praised President Obama’s effort to end homelessness among U.S. veterans in the near future. The results came from the “point-in-time” count, which occurs every year. The count last year was 76,329, whereas only 67,495 were counted this year.

A deeper look into the numbers shows that there were more homeless veterans not living in shelters no longer on the streets. The study shows there were 17% fewer veterans regularly sleeping in public places, such as streets, as compared to veterans who considered homeless living in transitional housing and shelters.

Sec. Donovan attributed much of the change to a shift in focus on the government’s end. Taking a more pro-active approach to preventing homelessness before veterans become homeless seems to be producing better results than attempting to fix the problem once it has already happened.

If you are a disabled veteran who has been denied disability compensation or have not yet applied for benefits from the VA, a South Florida disability attorney from LaVan & Neidenberg is ready to help. To learn if you are entitled to certain programs and benefits contact our veterans disability rights firm today 1-888-234-5758.

Veteran Advisory Board Support Veteran Transitional Housing Facility Location

Monday, July 18th, 2011

Last month, the Gainesville County Commission voted in favor of the proposed transitional housing  for veterans being located at the Gainesville Hotel and Conference Center. The County’s Veterans Advisory Board (VAB), however, was never consulted on the facility prior to the zoning application being filed.

 

Moving beyond their anger and frustration for not being included, the VAB held a vote to support the facility. The Department of Veterans Affairs was approved a grant worth $1,900,000 to be used to buy the property for the facility. The VAB feared, by not approving the facility, that grant would be lost and the Alachua County Housing Authority (ACHA) would find themselves in a difficult position.

The ACHA will operate the transitional housing facility and veterans with mental conditions will be offered shelter for 2 years inside the facility. Those conditions will include multiple mental health disorders and substance abuse problems. During their tenure, veterans will be given counseling for their particular condition as they are transitioned into more permanent housing and permanent employment.

There has been community resistance to the location of the housing facility. Residents, while claiming to be supportive of helping veterans, don’t necessarily want such a facility in the area as it could be “detrimental to nearby businesses and neighborhoods.”

Despite the VAB feeling they should have been more involved in the process, it seems everyone is on board now; however, issues will continue between the local residents and those attempting to put in the housing facility. The important thing is supporting our veterans.

If you are a disabled veteran who has been denied disability compensation or have not yet applied for benefits from the VA, contact LaVan & Neidenberg. You may be entitled to certain programs and benefits so contact our veterans disability rights firm today.

More VA Housing Available For Homeless Veterans And Their Families

Thursday, June 16th, 2011

The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) is still fighting to meet VA Sec. Eric Shinseki’s promise to eliminate homelessness among veterans. One of its main weapons in this fight has been expanding transitional housing. The VA’s latest initiative will create 34 new VA housing opportunities in cities across the nation.

The VA currently provides 15,000 transitional beds. This effort will add more than 5,000. Sec. Shinseki is proud of this effort as it will result in an improved quality of life for thousands of veterans and help the VA take another step toward eliminating veteran homelessness.

The Building Utilization Review and Repurposing (BURR) initiative is the result of 2 years of work. This enterprise had the VA find VA-owned buildings determined to be unused and underused yet suitable enough so as to be turned into a new housing opportunity. The housing will be occupied by veterans and their families determined to be “at-risk” for becoming homeless.

The VA utilized public and private funding to subsidize the program. They also used the VA’s enhanced-use lease (EUL) program, in which the VA maintains ownership of the land, and therefore controls the purpose for which the land is used.

The land will be used to provide safe and affordable housing for “at-risk” veterans, and will be awarded on a priority basis. The housing will be made available to both returning veterans as well as elderly veterans.

If you are a disabled veteran who has been denied disability compensation or have not yet applied for benefits from the VA, contact LaVan & Neidenberg. You may be entitled to certain programs and benefits so contact our veterans disability rights firm today.

New Transitional Housing Will Help Florida Homeless Veterans

Monday, March 21st, 2011

The home is not yet completed, but when it is, the Sherwood Veterans Transition Home will serve as transitional housing for homeless veterans in Brevard County, Florida. The home will house 6-7 veterans and they will be able to stay in the home for up to 2 years.

Bridges is the organization developing the transitional housing building, which traditionally works with disabled children and adults through their employment as well as both residential and educational programs. This is their first endeavor into the world of veterans’ issues, but seems an expected evolution. Bridges is renovating a former group home to into the transitional home.

The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) subsidized the renovation of the transition home with a $37,000 grant. Every veteran that stays in the house will pay rent equaling 30% of their income, and the home will rely on community donations. Much of the labor has been completed by people in the community donating their time and skills with many of the renovations focusing on replacing the floors and making the building wheelchair accessible.

Along with offering transportation to the local VA clinic, the home hopes to join forces with other organizations so as to offer help with employment as well as counseling services. Bridges is especially looking into partnering with veterans’ organizations, which they hope will help support the home.

The goal of the Sherwood Veterans Transition Home is to make their residents as self-reliant as possible. The more services offered, the more likely these veterans will be able to become independent and back on their feet. In the spirit of “it takes a village,” the community as a whole is supporting the home.

If you are a disabled veteran who has been denied disability compensation or have not yet applied for benefits from the VA, contact LaVan & Neidenberg. You may be entitled to certain programs and benefits so contact our veterans disability rights firm today.